quail chicks

How To Raise Coturnix Quail Chicks

Raising quail is an easy, fun, and ultimately rewarding hobby. Once your chicks are adults, you get fresh quail eggs! Not a bad deal, right? Quail are super easy to raise. This guide will show you how to raise quail chicks.

Picking the right breed of quail to raise is important, so be sure you’ve done your research on the available types of domestic quail. Generally, we recommend starting with coturnix quail.

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Whether you’ve picked up some quail chicks from a local seller or have chosen to hatch them yourself, this is how to raise quail chicks.

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Read More: How To Raise Quail For Eggs

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The brooder

Quail chicks require a draft-free brooder with a heat source. The ideal brooder offers about half a square foot of space per bird. That much space will be suitable for them up until their fifth week of life.

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A box, plastic tub, or even a water trough make good brooders. Check google for some ideas. Make sure that young chicks are not exposed to a slippery surface, as this can cause spraddle leg. Spraddle leg can be fixed but it’s best to avoid it all together.

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Read More: Where To Buy Quail Eggs

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Feeding your chicks

Chicks eat a 25-28% protein gamebird grower feed until 6 weeks of age. Turkey starter works well. You will likely have to grind it up into smaller pieces. Adults over 6 weeks eat a 20-22% protein feed.

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Care should be taken not to offer chicks a waterer that is too deep, as drowning can occur. A waterer with stones or marbles can prevent drowning. Fresh water and food must be available at all times. Your chicks will already know how to drink and eat.

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Keeping your chicks warm

Week-old quail chicks require a heat source that can provide 95 degree (F) temperatures. Temperature is reduced by 5 degrees every week until the 5th or 6th week, depending on what time of year it is.

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Observe quail behavior for several hours after shutting off the heat source. If they’re huddled up, it’s probably too cold. If they spend most of their time exploring their habitat, they probably aren’t too cold.

By the time your chicks are six weeks old, they will be fully feathered adults ready to move on to their new adult habitat.

Thomas Nelson
Environmental Advocate
Thomas is an environmental advocate currently residing in the Pacific Northwest. In his spare time, he enjoys experiencing the outdoors, raising chickens and ducks, and reading about current environmental issues. Despite slight colorblindness, his favorite color is green.
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