lavender leaves and flowers

How To Transplant Lavender Plants

Lavender is a fragrant, drought-tolerant plant that is popular in garden settings. It is best known for its beautiful flowers and its calming scent. Transplanting lavender is a great way to bring this beloved plant to your outdoor space. Whether you’re adding a few lavender plants to an existing flower bed or starting a whole new garden, this guide will provide you with all the information you need to successfully transplant lavender. You’ll learn about selecting a suitable location, preparing the soil, and transplanting and caring for your lavender plants. With a little bit of effort, you’ll have a thriving lavender garden in no time!

There are a variety of popular lavender varieties, all of which have their own unique set of qualities. English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is native to the Mediterranean and is renowned for its sweet, floral aroma and deep purple flowers. French lavender (Lavandula stoechas) is native to the Mediterranean and is known for its bold aroma and pinkish-purple flowers. Spanish lavender (Lavandula dentata) is native to Spain and is known for its strong aroma and dark purple. Lastly, Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia) is a hybrid variety of English and French lavender and is known for its strong, sweet aroma and light purple flowers. All of these popular lavender varieties are popular for their beauty, aroma, and versatility.

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Preparations For Transplanting Lavender

Make sure you have the necessary materials. You’ll need a shovel, a watering can, and some good-quality potting soil. Begin by digging up the lavender plant, taking care to keep as much of the roots intact as possible. Once the plant is out of the ground, shake off any excess dirt and place it in the new pot. Fill the pot with potting soil and gently pack the soil around the roots. Be sure to leave a few inches of space between the top of the soil and the rim of the pot. Additionally, water the soil until it is damp.

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Key Elements To Transplanting Successfully

When transplanting, it is important to choose well-draining soil and a sunny, sheltered spot. When planting, dig a hole twice as wide as the pot and fill it with soil. Water thoroughly, then mulch with a layer of coarse gravel or bark to help retain moisture. Once planted, water your lavender deeply every few days during the growing season, especially during dry spells.

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Lavender is highly drought tolerant, but it still requires consistent moisture to thrive, especially after a recent transplant. Provide your lavender with well-draining soil so that the roots are not too crowded or waterlogged. After transplanting, water the lavender deeply, but avoid overwatering. Lavender should only be watered when the soil is dry to the touch.

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Transplanting to a new pot

Transplanting lavender to a new pot is a great way to give your lavender a new home and a boost of nutrients. When transplanting lavender, be sure to use a pot with good drainage and a soil mix that is light and has plenty of organic matter. Select a container that is about 30% larger than the pot your lavender has outgrown. When transplanting, it is important to be gentle with the roots and to cover them with soil. Be sure to water the lavender well after transplanting and to keep the pot in an area with plenty of sunlight. With a bit of care, your lavender should be happy in its new pot.

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Lavender Aftercare

Prune your lavender regularly to keep it compact and promote new growth. Deadhead spent flowers to encourage a longer blooming season. In colder climates, insulate your lavender with a thick layer of mulch in the winter. Additionally, be sure to check for pests and diseases regularly, and treat them accordingly.

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Pruning the lavender can help to promote bushier growth and should be done in the spring or summer. Deadheading spent blooms can also help the lavender put its energy into producing more flowers. A low-nitrogen fertilizer that’s formulated with a low-nitrogen content is great for encouraging blooming. However, general-purpose fertilizer will also work if it’s diluted. Feeding only during the spring and summer months with a 7-9-5 or 15-15-15 fertilizer. Generally, lavender doesn’t need to be fertilized, but fertilizer may be helpful after being transplanted.

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Cody Medina
Small Scale Farmer
Hi there! I'm Cody, a staff writer here at The Garden Magazine and a small-scale farmer living in Oregon. I've been gardening most of my life and now live on a quarter-acre farmstead with chickens, ducks, and a big garden.
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